Practice Matches

Players shouldn’t be concerned with wins and losses on the practice match court. They should be focused on running plays, trying new tactics, working technique, sharpening your weapons, and developing parts of their games that aren’t 100% ready for live matches. Start looking at your practice matches as opportunities to hone your skills rather than focusing on winning and your tennis will improve. Being able to practice executing these things in a setting that doesn’t officially count allows players to become more confident in areas of their game that they otherwise may avoid in a sanctioned match.

Second Serve Location: Body Jam

2nd serve Win % is one of the major indicators of success in a tennis match. In recent times we have been seeing second serve average speeds from players like Nick Kyrgios and Dani Medvedev that are close to matching their first serve averages. Using this as a mix-up strategy to keep their opponents off…

The Tennis Gamesmanship Guide

Players at all levels of the game bend the rules to gain an advantage or rattle their opponents with the aim of throwing them off their game. Sometimes they do it with sinister intent and sometimes not, but knowing these tricks in advance will prepare you to deal with gamesmanship and keep you focused on…

G.O.A.T 2 handed Backhands: 3 elite set up commonalities

There are many ways to hit a 2 handed backhand, and there have been many great 2 handers both currently on tour and in years past. While their grip, stances, contact and follow through may differ slightly, (and that’s what makes them different and unique) there are certain fundamental commonalities between them that you can…

Flexible Returning

Being flexible in your return position is a huge key to helping you visually change your opponents landscape, influence the server and help you to time your return better. Here are some options if you are struggling with your return game.

Leading Edge Volleys

The ability to take the pace off the ball at net often separates good from great volleyers. This is equally as important in singles as it is in doubles. If you want to be a complete tennis player you need to be able to absorb the pace of a groundstroke and defend at the net…

Depth before Direction

Depth before direction. There are many different singles strategies that can help win you matches depending on your opponent. However, simplifying singles tennis strategy to depth before direction can radically help your club and junior players win more matches. Too often mistakes are made by players looking to pull the trigger early in the point…

Top 10 tennis shots you must have

Having these shots in your tennis toolbox will allow you to use many different strategies to use against your opponents in both singles and doubles.

Improve your ball placement

Good tennis players use depth, angles and spins to take their opponents out of their comfort zones. All of which require a certain level of accuracy. Every club player loves to crush a short forehand or overhead, but the reality is that most shots at this level require greater control than power to end the…

Tennis tips from the big 4

Novak Djokovic Novak Djokovic has the epitome of perfect set up and finish technique on both his forehand and two handed backhand. Its textbook. His preparation is early and he uses his shoulders to complete his unit turn, his contact is in front of his body and he finishes his strokes with complete rotation of…

Seeing Doubles

Vision and anticipation in doubles Theres probably nothing we take for granted more as athletes than our vision. Good players have good vision and anticipation but great players have great vision and anticipation. The average player should work on how they anticipate each shot coming and really improve overall the way they construct and finish points….

Courage on the court

It takes courage to become a great tennis player. In fact it takes courage to become even a decent player. Whether you are a stone cold beginner or a top 10 pro, every player knows what it feels like to be afraid to fail. To be afraid to lose a match, afraid to lose your…